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Evidence from Resource 6 pieces of evidence from this resource.

National Transportation Safety Board (1986). China Airlines B-747-SP, 300 NM Northwest of San Francisco, February 19, 1985. Aircraft Accident Report NTSB/AAR-86-03. Washington, DC: National Transportation Safety Board.

  1.  
  2. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Accident Report
    Evidence: "3. CONCLUSIONS ... 3.1 Findings ... 10. The lateral control deflections required to maintain level flight under conditions of thrust asymmetry and decreasing airspeed exceeded the limits of the autopilot's lateral control authority, causing the airplane to roll and yaw to the right. The captain lost control of the airplane when, after disengaging the autopilot, he failed to make the proper flight control corrections to recover the airplane." (page 34)
    Issue: manual operation may be difficult after transition from automated control (Issue #55) See Issue details
    Strength: +5
    Aircraft: B747-SP-09
    Equipment: autoflight

  3.  
  4. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Accident Report
    Evidence: "The Safety Board also concludes that the captain over-relied on the autopilot and that this was also causal to the accident since the autopilot effectively masked the approaching onset of the loss of control of the airplane." (page 32)
    Issue: pilots may over-rely on automation (Issue #106) See Issue details
    Strength: +5
    Aircraft: B747-SP-09
    Equipment: autoflight: autopilot

  5.  
  6. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Accident Report
    Evidence: "The Safety Board concludes that one of the causal factors of the accident was the captain's reliance on the autopilot while the airplane was decelerating. During this 3 minute 40 second period, the captain allowed himself to remain removed from the `control loop' by leaving the autopilot engaged. As a result, he was not aware of the increasing control inputs required to maintain level flight." (page 30)
    Issue: pilots may be out of the loop (Issue #2) See Issue details
    Strength: +5
    Aircraft: B747-SP-09
    Equipment: autoflight: autopilot

  7.  
  8. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Accident Report
    Evidence: "... the flight instruments remain the primary tools at high altitudes for maintaining level, stabilized flight in large airplanes. The captain's statement corroborated the fact that he was relying on these instruments for that purpose. Under these conditions, therefore, the primary instrument for attitude control was the attitude director indicator, which may not have concerned the captain initially since it depicted either a wings-level attitude or a very slight left-wing-down bank. With regard to heading, over the period between 1011:09 to about 1014:00, the heading increased about 4 degrees, a change so slight as to be almost imperceptible. Thus, except for airspeed, which concerned the captain greatly, the only thing in the cockpit that would have depicted the worsening control situation was the control wheel's increasing left-wing-down deflection. However, this was an area which was not included in the captain's regular instrument scan pattern, and since he was not `hands on', he was not aware of the deflection." (page 30)
    Issue: behavior of automation may not be apparent (Issue #83) See Issue details
    Strength: +4
    Aircraft: B747-SP-09
    Equipment: autoflight

  9.  
  10. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Accident Report
    Evidence: "The Safety Board concludes that one of the causal factors of the accident was the captain's reliance on the autopilot while the airplane was decelerating. During this 3 minute 40 second period, the captain allowed himself to remain removed from the `control loop' by leaving the autopilot engaged. As a result, he was not aware of the increasing control inputs required to maintain level flight." (page 30)
    Issue: situation awareness may be reduced (Issue #114) See Issue details
    Strength: +4
    Aircraft: B747-SP-09
    Equipment: autoflight: autopilot

  11.  
  12. Evidence Type: Excerpt from Accident Report
    Evidence: "3. CONCLUSIONS 3.1 Findings ... 10. The lateral control deflections required to maintain level flight under conditions of thrust asymmetry and decreasing airspeed exceeded the limits of the autopilot's lateral control authority, causing the airplane to roll and yaw to the right. The captain lost control of the airplane when, after disengaging the autopilot, he failed to make the proper flight control corrections to recover the airplane." (page 33-34)
    Issue: automation may not work well under unusual conditions (Issue #150) See Issue details
    Strength: +2
    Aircraft: B747-SP
    Equipment: autoflight: autopilot
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